Social Media Companies Vowed To Stop Videos of Terror Attacks. Buffalo Showed They Have More Work To Do

Many versions of these videos had been edited—with added text or blurring or cropping—in apparent successful attempts to evade the platforms’ automated removal systems, according to Jacob Berntsson, the head of policy and research at Tech Against Terrorism, a U.N.-backed project for countering online extremism. Copies of the video were circulating on Twitter and Facebook on Saturday and Sunday, according to multiple media reports.

“He knew that as long as there was time for people to watch and download, then this would spread [online] regardless of how quickly Twitch took it down,” said Berntsson in an interview on Monday, referring to the attacker. “Clearly an audience was ready and prepared to download this kind of stuff.”

Time magazine, 17 May 2022

Inside Somalia’s War on Al-Shabab Disinformation

Inside Somalia’s War on Al-Shabab Disinformation

Adam Hadley is the executive director of Tech Against Terrorism, a non-profit based in London that focuses on disrupting the use of the internet by...

Read More
Hitler chatbot ‘a clear security threat’ amid radicalisation fears

Hitler chatbot ‘a clear security threat’ amid radicalisation fears

"Tech against Terrorism, a UN-backed group that combats online extremism, has raised concerns about the Gab chatbots. Adam Hadley, its executive...

Read More
Here's How Violent Extremists Are Exploiting Generative AI tools

Here's How Violent Extremists Are Exploiting Generative AI tools

“We're going to partner with Microsoft to figure out if there are ways using our archive of material to create a sort of gen AI detection system in...

Read More